Keronchong for Pak Bakar

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Synopsis

After a six-year hiatus following Koridor, Nizam returned with Keronchong For Pak Bakar. A lyrical ode to the 85-year- old Abu Bakar Ali, P Ramlee’s cinematographer during the golden age of the Malay film industry in the 1950s and 60s, this documentary is one of Nizam’s most personal and moving films. For many years Nizam had been researching and working to develop a film about the legendary icon of Malay cinema, P Ramlee. By chance, Nizam found out that Abu Bakar Ali, or Pak Bakar, was living in the same apartment block as him and made initial contact by sliding letters through Pak Bakar’s door. The film is a chronicle of the friendship between the two filmmakers from different eras, and shows Nizam’s affinity and reverence for Malay cinema. Constructed like a series of letters to Pak Bakar, Nizam talks about his personal filmmaking journey and the influence of his late father, an army captain who shared with Nizam a deep love of cinema.

Credits

  • One of the most original and distinctive voices in Singapore29June-Coverage cinema, Abdul Nizam was a filmmaker who never stopped searching for the truth of humanity in all his works. From his breakthrough short film Datura to his final feature film Breaking the Ice, he constantly finds new ways to see and understand ourselves and the world around us. Gifted with an innate sense of rhythm and an imaginative eye for the visual language of cinema, Nizam’s films are sensorial and thought-provoking examinations of our reality and identity.
  • N/A
  • Abdul Nizam
  • N/A
  • N/A

Breaking the Ice

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Synopsis

“You believe that you can capture reality. But it is impossible. You can always go further.” – Abbas Kiarostami

With Kiarostami’s thesis on the nature of cinema and reality as inspiration and starting point, Breaking the Ice explores the boundaries between film and performance, the nature of art versus life, and the question of what it means to be an artist. Centred on a filmed performance art by Singaporean artist Jeremy Hiah, the film deconstructs and reconfigures the footage with both imagined and actual images from the artist’s daily life, attempting to arrive at the essential truth of reality that eludes the lens of the camera. Breaking the Ice was in many ways a homecoming of sorts for Nizam. It brought together his former film school friends like Lau Hon Meng (cinematographer) and Dennis Tan (sound), and reunited his old band, The NoNames, to work together on the film. A thought-provoking discourse between artist and filmmaker, and performance and cinema, Breaking the Ice was Nizam’s final feature-length work.

Credits

  • One of the most original and distinctive voices in Singapore29June-Coverage cinema, Abdul Nizam was a filmmaker who never stopped searching for the truth of humanity in all his works. From his breakthrough short film Datura to his final feature film Breaking the Ice, he constantly finds new ways to see and understand ourselves and the world around us. Gifted with an innate sense of rhythm and an imaginative eye for the visual language of cinema, Nizam’s films are sensorial and thought-provoking examinations of our reality and identity.
  • Abdul Nizam Khan
  • Abdul Nizam
  • Jeremy Hiah, Patricia Toh, Myra Hiah
  • N/A

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